How to take a “SAFE” road-trip with your pooch

BEST DOG ON THE BLOCK  Dog Tips 

 

How to take a “safe” road-trip with your pooch.

by Mark Siebel – Owner – DOGGIE STEPS Dog Training

 

So, you just finished watching “Driving Miss Daisy” and you want to take your new puppy for a road trip.  GREAT!  But remember, driving is hard enough when you are trying to concentrate on other drivers, pedestrians, stray Javelinas, trying to text, and NOW an energetic puppy!  It’s okay to take your dog with you on your travels, but safety must always prevail.  To ensure you get to the dog park in one piece, follow the below simple tips:

 

1.                    Dogs belong in the back seat.   Your dog must learn that they come second BEHIND you, the “pack leader.”  By keeping your dog behind you in the car, you are reinforcing the pack order that human is first and dog is second.  Therefore, keep Fido in the back seat.  There are doggie seat belts available from your local pet store, OR use a “stay” command to keep your dog from coming into the front seats.

2.                    Restricted access to windows.   Besides eating and walking, a dog’s next favorite activity is putting their head out a car window!  Not only does this cool them off, but their strong sense of smell cause them to be mesmerized by thousands of new odors rushing into their noses!  With this said, safety is still of utmost importance.  Only lower the rear windows enough so the dogs head can stick out, and then LOCK the power window controls to restrict the windows from accidently lowering or raising any further.  NEVER have a dog in the rear of a pick-up truck unleashed.

 

Taking Fido for a car ride can be fun.  Just remember that “safety” is always the main priority when traveling with your dog.

 

Mark Siebel has trained over 500 Arizona Valley dogs, has dog training tips published monthly in various AZ magazines, appears on NBC Arizona Midday & ABC Sonoran Living, speaks regularly with local schools youth groups about the importance of dog safety and ownership, and donates time to kids who want to learn more about dogs.  He is a member of APPSA (Arizona Professional Pet Sitters Association) and ASC of Arizona (Australian Shepherd Club of Arizona).  Mark owns (2) Australian Shepherds named Leinie and Kugel.  Voted 2008 runner-up “Best Dog Trainer in Phoenix” by SonoranTails Pet Magazine.  For more information or general dog questions, go to:  http://www.doggiestepsdogtraining.com/index.html or call Mark @602.318.0122.

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Unconditional Love? Take some advice from your dog.

BEST DOG ON THE BLOCK  Dog Tips 

 

Need a change in your personal relationships?  Take some advice from your dog.

by Mark Siebel – Owner – DOGGIE STEPS Dog Training

 

As a dog trainer in the Valley for over four years, I have yet to meet a customer who doesn’t display an overpowering connection, passion, and love for their dog.  Sure, they say that a real man doesn’t cry, but the love that he displays for his dog is worldly.  The closest thing to unconditional love from a dog, is the love a mother has for her child.  We joke that “dysfunctional” families have disputes that often seem as if they CANNOT be resolved.  The love from a dog lasts forever and is truly unconditional.  To ensure your wife doesn’t pick the dog over YOU for movie night, follow the below simple tips:

 

1.                    Listening is the KEY to communication.   A dog’s best sense is scent.  What is a human’s best sense?  Who really knows?  Dogs act on instinct where human beings act on feelings and emotions.  80% of my job as a dog trainer is listening, and the remainder is problem-solving and reassurance.  Having two ears and only ONE mouth should give us a hint!

 

2.                    Forgiveness and flexibility.   Have you ever known a dog to hold a grudge?  If so, for how long?  I have NEVER seen a dog at a dog park go home with ANOTHER owner!  Dogs are loyal and will remain with their original owner unless separated at the owner’s choice.  Don’t be so rigid with your loved ones.  It takes years to make acquaintances and only MINUTES to lose them!  Joy takes less energy than anger.  Forgive more and judge less.

 

Are humans designed for unconditional love?  Observe your dog’s behaviors and begin your path to find the answer to this question.

 

Mark Siebel has trained over 500 Arizona Valley dogs, has dog training tips published monthly in various AZ magazines, appears on NBC Arizona Midday & ABC Sonoran Living, speaks regularly with local schools youth groups about the importance of dog safety and ownership, and donates time to kids who want to learn more about dogs.  He is a member of APPSA (Arizona Professional Pet Sitters Association) and ASC of Arizona (Australian Shepherd Club of Arizona).  Mark owns (2) Australian Shepherds named Leinie and Kugel.  Voted 2008 runner-up “Best Dog Trainer in Phoenix” by SonoranTails Pet Magazine.  For more information or general dog questions, go to:  http://www.doggiestepsdogtraining.com/index.html or call Mark @602.318.0122.

Houston SPCA caring for dogs seized from filthy trailer

Owner says circling UFOs made the animals unhealthy

By ANITA HASSAN
Copyright 2008 Houston Chronicle

Dec. 13, 2008, 8:56PM

photo
James Nielsen Chronicle

Dr. Dev Rajan, of the Houston SPCA, holds one of the terriers seized from a trailer in Fayette County earlier this month.

Houston SPCA veterinarian Roberta Westbrook lifted a trembling toy English fox terrier into her arms Saturday afternoon to examine the dog’s emaciated body.

The spine and ribs of the malnourished terrier were visible. The dog’s nails were overgrown and her tiny paws were soiled from living in her own feces. The dog was among 42 terriers brought to the Houston SPCA Friday from the Gardenia E. Janssen Animal Shelter in Fayette County.

Authorities in Fayette County seized the dogs on Dec. 3, after they were found living in a 5-by-9 foot trailer — eating, sleeping and giving birth in their own waste — with a woman who claimed the terriers were unhealthy because UFOs were circling above her home, said Houston SPCA spokeswoman Meera Nandlal.

“We don’t know if she was breeding them or why she was living with them in such a small space, ” Nandlal said.

Authorities in Fayette County could not be reached for comment on Saturday. It is unknown at this time if any charges will be brought against the woman.

The animal shelter enlisted the Houston SPCA’s help to house and care for the 40 dogs, some of whom are as old as 10. The terrier Westbrook was examining gave birth to two female puppies since she was removed from the trailer.

Most of the dogs are in poor physical condition. Two of them are missing limbs for unknown reasons.

“They could be purebred, but not the best standard,” Westbrook said.

All the dogs will undergo medical and behavioral evaluations. After being cleaned and treated, healthy dogs will be put up for adoption, Westbrook said, adding that those who need more time to recover will be placed in foster care.

The Houston SPCA often sees many large animal seizures, Nandlal said. Recently, the organization took in 70 feral cats.

“Unfortunately, it’s not unusual, ” she said. “There are all kinds of animals that are put into situations they have no control of.”

Dog ‘sniffs out’ cancer

Beamish the dog

Beamish sniffed out a melanoma on his owner’s chest

A man from north Oxfordshire has credited his pet Rottweiler with sniffing out his skin cancer.

Chris Tuffrey, from Banbury, had a mole on his chest for 15 years but “put his head in the sand” and ignored it.

But he said thanks to his dog Beamish “nuzzling and licking” him and trying to lift his arm near the mole, he went to a doctor to get it checked out.

Within a two weeks, melanoma was confirmed by the hospital and the cancerous mole was removed.

Mr Tuffrey said when Beamish began nuzzling him he thought, “what’s wrong with me”.

When he visited his doctor in Deddington and was immediately referred to Oxford’s Churchill Hospital.

Within a fortnight, melanoma was confirmed and the cancerous mole was removed.

I shall be grateful to him for the rest of my life
Chris Tuffrey

Mr Tuffrey’s case is not unique. Scientists have found in trials, dogs have detected cancers in the urine of patients despite medical tests giving negative results.

Mr Tuffrey considers Beamish a very special friend.

”He’s absolutely brilliant,” he said.

“He’s a very laid back dog, and I shall be grateful to him for the rest of my life.”

Man dies after going into fire to save dog

Man dies after going into fire to save dog

Cicero officials say 68-year-old became unresponsive after being put in the back of a patrol car

Cicero officials said a 68-year-old man who didn’t want to leave his dog in his burning home became unresponsive after being put in the back of a patrol car and later died at an area hospital.

John Petrik lived alone with his 13-year-old German shepherd mix, Regis, in a home in the 1600 block of South Lombard Avenue.

Petrik was pronounced dead at 2:10 a.m. Wednesday in MacNeal Hospital in Berwyn, the Cook County medical examiner’s office said. His dog suffered smoke inhalation and burns and is under intensive care with an Oak Park veterinarian.

Officials said that when they arrived at the home about 2 a.m., Petrik was in the house. After being approached by emergency crews, he refused to leave, saying he didn’t want to leave his dog.

Petrik ran into a back room and held a door shut, according to town spokesman Dan Proft. Police forcibly removed Petrik. As paramedics were called, Petrik was put in the back of a squad car, where he was frantic saying his dog was still in the house, Proft said.

When emergency officials arrived, Petrik was unresponsive and rushed to MacNeal. Proft said firefighters went into the house and saved the dog.

Officials said, according to a preliminary investigation, the fire likely was caused by a short in a space heater.

Neighbors said the home was a neighborhood corner store, which Petrik and his mother ran in the 1970s. He was liked by neighbors, who said he looked out for them and helped them with their cars.

Dr. Cesar C. Agustin, who is treating the dog at AAmerican Animal Hospital in Oak Park, said Petrik stopped by his office every two weeks, for vitamins and other things for the dog.

“He’s one of those people . . . he just cared deeply for this dog,” Agustin said.

Agustin said that Cicero’s animal care and control office has received three calls from people who would adopt the dog. Agustin said he will likely know the dog’s fate in the next 24 hours.

Joseph Ruzich is a freelance writer, and John Bisognano is Tribune reporter.

Holiday DOG Safety

BEST DOG ON THE BLOCK  Dog Tips 

 

Holidays and your dog.  How to make them happy and safe for all!

by Mark Siebel – Owner – DOGGIE STEPS Dog Training

 

‘Tis the season to be jolly!  Another Holiday season has arrived.  The Holidays often bring new people, irresistible foods, and other temptations into our homes, and we need to be aware of the safety of our pets.  Dogs are curious by nature and their heightened sense of smell can many times get them into trouble.

 

There are numerous items around our homes during the Holiday Season from which we must be sure our dogs steer clear.  Every dog will have a different threshold level (based on breed, age, and weight), but it is best to try to eliminate ANY of the below items from our dogs reach to ensure strong health and safety:

 

1.                    Plants & Trees.  Poinsettias, Christmas cactus, hemlock, holly, ivy, mistletoe, balsam, cedar, juniper, fir, pine, avocado, geranium, marijuana, ferns, aloe, and tiger lilies can ALL cause irritation, vomiting, diarrhea, nausea, and even death if ingested.  Try to spray the leaves or plants with Bitter Apple, or simply position the items out of the dogs reach.  For a festive tree, use the “LEAVE IT” command if you notice your dog chewing or smelling the branches.  Sap and needles can be hard for a dog to digest, and will most certainly be a cause for illness.  Consumption of ANY listed items in this article should be dealt with on a dog-to-dog basis.  Symptoms of serious illness include:  excessive diarrhea, not drinking water, and excessive vomiting.  If this happens, contact your vet immediately.

 

2.                    Food/snack items.   Many foods must be OFF limits to your dog. Be aware of the following items when cooking or if you take your dog to a friends home or public place:  *Chocolate (can cause Theobromine poisoning in your dog)  *Onions, grapes, raisins (studies have shown the skins of these foods to be indigestible by dogs.)  Even chewing gum has been shown to cause irritation to a dogs internal digestive systems. 

 

3.                    Miscellaneous items.   The following are a variety of items that can be found around your home  that can be toxic to your dog’s health:  Antifreeze, bleach, Tylenol, ibuprofen, watch batteries, moth balls, fabric softeners and other detergents, mouthwash, alcohol, and peach/avocado pits or other fruit seeds.  It is okay to vary a dog’s diet, but do it with quality meat kibble and fresh cooked, unseasoned meats only!  This will keep your dog interested in its own food and more eager to eat it.  DO NOT give scraps from the dinner table or your dog may begin to beg from you.

 

4.                    Good, common sense.  Dogs are carnivores, so their diet consists primarily of meat.  It should go without saying; don’t feed your dog Doritos or Mac Donald’s!  It’s okay to give your dog an occasional lick of your ice cream cone or a small piece of cheese, but use good ole’ fashion common sense when deciding what your dog should eat.  Also, given the sensitivity of most dogs digestive systems, a routine diet should be maintained. 

 

So, when you hear the Holiday dinner bell ringing, enjoy your feast o’ plenty.  Holidays bring out the best energy in humans, therefore making our dogs that much more comfortable and excited.  Pass me another double baked potato!  Just be sure that Fido is eating his dog food, and not your Angel Food Cake.

 

Mark Siebel has trained over 500 Arizona Valley dogs, has dog training tips published monthly in various AZ magazines, appears on NBC Arizona Midday & ABC Sonoran Living, speaks regularly with local schools youth groups about the importance of dog safety and ownership, and donates time to kids who want to learn more about dogs.  He is a member of APPSA (Arizona Professional Pet Sitters Association) and ASC of Arizona (Australian Shepherd Club of Arizona).  Mark owns (2) Australian Shepherds named Leinie and Kugel.  For more information or general dog questions, go to:  http://www.doggiestepsdogtraining.com/index.html or call Mark @602.318.0122.

Previously Owned Dogs

Previously Owned Dogs
By: Gerry Ronson

When you have looking to adopt a dog there are many considerations you must make. First you are going to look at the types of dog breeds and which one may be your favourite. Once you have determine the type of dog you want you have to consider the living arrangements, get the crate, bed, food bowls, and other dog care needs. You are also going to be choosing your dog based on the cost of the actual dog. There can be high costs related to adopting a dog, especially if you find the dog through a breeder. In these considerations you may want to look at pre- owned dogs. Most of us like to have a puppy so that it is raised with us and our family. We also like the ability to make sure the dog has been trained to our specifications and that bad behaviours no longer exist. When you are searching for a pre- owned dog there are many considerations in this area that you should look at.

First a pre owned dog should be trained. They should have gone through socialization and obedience training at the very least as a puppy. The owner should also continue this training as the dog ages. If the owner has done their job in the proper care and training you can be rather confident that the dog will have the best behaviour they are capable of.

You should also consider the behavioural changes a pre- owned dog can experience. You will find that most dogs have at least one person they fall in love with and consider their master. When a pre- owned dog is abandoned by this person you can have a resulting behaviour change. This means that the dog may have been wonderfully sweet, playful, and willing to accept your affections while in the care of their original master, but once they leave the nest, as it were, they may experience separation anxiety and develop bad behaviours. They may even try to run away. This means that you have to be very careful in your consideration. Take the time to get to know the dog. Take the dog to your home a couple of times, have the dog without the owner present, and make the dog feel at home. You can help the dog feel more comfortable before they leave their current home to avoid some behavioural issues.

Most often with a pre- owned dog you are getting the best behaviour, but you are also getting an older dog. This may be something that makes the choice for you. An older dog is not going to be as energetic, and they may even have issues regarding health. It will of course depend on the breed as well as the care they have had their entire life.

You may also want to think about the reason the dog is going to be sold. Has the dog developed a health problem the owner is not disclosing, or are they moving some where the dog is not allowed? There are many reasons for a dog owner to give up a dog. It is important to know those reasons before taking the dog home with you. You should take the dog to a vet for a complete checkup to make sure you have a healthy dog.

You also want to make sure you understand the care and feeding the dog will need. Some owners have their dogs on special diets. This means you need to follow those rules in order to make sure the dog stays healthy and will continue to be happy.