Houston SPCA caring for dogs seized from filthy trailer

Owner says circling UFOs made the animals unhealthy

By ANITA HASSAN
Copyright 2008 Houston Chronicle

Dec. 13, 2008, 8:56PM

photo
James Nielsen Chronicle

Dr. Dev Rajan, of the Houston SPCA, holds one of the terriers seized from a trailer in Fayette County earlier this month.

Houston SPCA veterinarian Roberta Westbrook lifted a trembling toy English fox terrier into her arms Saturday afternoon to examine the dog’s emaciated body.

The spine and ribs of the malnourished terrier were visible. The dog’s nails were overgrown and her tiny paws were soiled from living in her own feces. The dog was among 42 terriers brought to the Houston SPCA Friday from the Gardenia E. Janssen Animal Shelter in Fayette County.

Authorities in Fayette County seized the dogs on Dec. 3, after they were found living in a 5-by-9 foot trailer — eating, sleeping and giving birth in their own waste — with a woman who claimed the terriers were unhealthy because UFOs were circling above her home, said Houston SPCA spokeswoman Meera Nandlal.

“We don’t know if she was breeding them or why she was living with them in such a small space, ” Nandlal said.

Authorities in Fayette County could not be reached for comment on Saturday. It is unknown at this time if any charges will be brought against the woman.

The animal shelter enlisted the Houston SPCA’s help to house and care for the 40 dogs, some of whom are as old as 10. The terrier Westbrook was examining gave birth to two female puppies since she was removed from the trailer.

Most of the dogs are in poor physical condition. Two of them are missing limbs for unknown reasons.

“They could be purebred, but not the best standard,” Westbrook said.

All the dogs will undergo medical and behavioral evaluations. After being cleaned and treated, healthy dogs will be put up for adoption, Westbrook said, adding that those who need more time to recover will be placed in foster care.

The Houston SPCA often sees many large animal seizures, Nandlal said. Recently, the organization took in 70 feral cats.

“Unfortunately, it’s not unusual, ” she said. “There are all kinds of animals that are put into situations they have no control of.”

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Dog Frozen; Animal Abuse or Stupidity

The spirit dog’s blog has a ‘gem’ of a story that he has discovered….. It makes me look around at ‘our’ species, ‘the human race’ in disbelief.

Does God sits up there wondering “what was  I thinking?”. . .

http://thespiritdog.wordpress.com/2008/12/06/dog-frozen-animal-abuse-or-stupidity/

‘Hero Dog’ Pulls Injured Friend From Oncoming Traffic

If you’ve wondered if dogs possess a spirit or a conscience, or if they truly are able to think for themselves ?…

Do you wonder what really lies behind those soulful eyes of your pet?

Watch this following video for your answer….

And oh yes, when you are done start thinking about animal testing and dog fighting, animal cruelty etc…

Monday, December 08, 2008

Footage from a traffic camera overlooking a busy freeway in Santiago, Chile captured a dog performing a heroic act — pulling an injured friend from oncoming traffic.

The video, from Azteca America Colorado, shows an injured dog lying in the middle of a freeway after being hit by a car, while a rescue dog dodges traffic to run to its side. The rescue dog then drags the severely injured canine across lanes of traffic as cars swerve around it.

No motorists stopped to help either dog, but a highway crew arrives at the end of the video.

The translation of the announcer is as follows:

“These images seen from the surveillance cameras show a very common situation with our overpopulated highways. It is normal for us to see dogs run over. In the video, we can see this dog fighting for his life because he was run over by the vehicle.

“What is very touching is to see the very heroic actions of this other dog who is trying to pull him to the side of the highway. We are going to keep seeing things like this until we find a solution to the dogs living on the streets.”

Support for First Dog

mutts1901Support for First Dog
Article Tools Sponsored By
By GEORGE GENE GUSTINES; Compiled by STEVEN McELROY
Published: December 7, 2008

Soon after President-elect Barack Obama spoke at a news conference about getting his daughters a pet from an animal shelter because “a lot of shelter dogs are mutts like me,” Patrick McDonnell, creator of the comic strip “Mutts,” leapt into action. He quickly devised six strips supporting shelter adoptions.
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King Features Syndicate

“I normally stay away from politics, but this was a perfect fit,” Mr. McDonnell wrote in an e-mail message.

The sequence, which begins on Monday, features Mooch the cat and Earl the dog, above, discussing the next first pet. “If the Obama household adopted a mutt,” Mr. McDonnell added, “it would make a huge statement.” “Mutts,” distributed by King Features Syndicate, appears in more than 700 newspapers worldwide and online at muttscomics.com.

Dog electrocuted on Long Island City street

Dog electrocuted on Long Island City street

A woman is mourning after her dog was killed by a stray jolt of electricity from a light pole in Queens.

Celia Sing says she was taking her 7-year-old Siberian husky, Sebastian, for a walk on Sunday near her apartment in Long Island City when he stopped at the pole.

Sing says her dog fell to the ground and began shaking uncontrollably before dying right in front of her eyes.

Because of the holiday weekend, Sing said she was unable to get answers from the Department of Transportation.

The light pole was replaced on Monday.

Department spokesman Seth Solomonow says engineers have made the area safe, but the cause of the stray voltage has not yet been determined.

He adds: “Safety is our top priority on the streets of New York.”

Drug bust dog gone wrong

Drug bust dog gone wrong

  • Hong Kong
  • May 29, 2008

JAPAN’S customs authority has said sorry for planting cannabis on an incoming Hong Kong passenger to test out one of its sniffer dogs.

Embarrassed officials had to issue a public appeal to the passenger to return the 142 grams of cannabis after the dog failed to detect it and the customs officer forgot in which bag he planted the drugs.

The incident on Sunday, involving a passenger on a Cathay Pacific flight into Tokyo, brought an outcry from the Hong Kong Government and tourism officials. The drugs — worth almost $US10,000 ($A10,440) — were recovered on Monday evening from the passenger in a Tokyo hotel. It is not known if the passenger was traced or alerted officials.

A customs spokesman told the South China Morning Post the department offered “our deepest apologies”.

DPA

A face-lift for a dog? Brazilian vet does it all

‘Good symmetry is very important’

By MEI-LING HOPGOOD
COX NEWS SERVICE

SAO PAULO, Brazil — Is Fido in need of a face-lift?

Go see Edgado Brito, who is advancing the practice of pet plastic surgery in a land with a worldwide reputation for making people beautiful by any means.

Brazilians have long been known for their penchant for cosmetic surgery, and Brito has been adapting those techniques for use on animals.

“Plastic surgery is good for dogs!” said Brito, 45, a Doberman breeder who has worked as a veterinarian for 20 years.

He can make protruding ears droop and uses Metacril to straighten bent ears. He uses Botox to fix inverted eyelashes. He has even tightened the mammillae of a couple of female dogs, whose owners wanted to show them after they had given birth.

Simple surgeries usually cost from about $100 to $200.

In Brazil, the United States and Europe, pet plastic surgery is increasingly in demand, despite objections from animal rights activists and some dog breeders.

The American Kennel Club, which sets the rules for the recognized breeds on the U.S. dog-show circuit, prohibits any surgery that alters a dog’s appearance, other than the cropping of ears and tails to meet breed standards.

But the prohibition on surgery is difficult to define and enforce. Two years ago, an award-winning Pekingese in Britain was the subject of an inquiry when rumors swirled that its face had been surgically enhanced. The dog and its owners were acquitted and allowed to keep the award from the 2003 Crufts Dog Show.

In Brazil, Brito keeps abreast of human plastic-surgery trends and attends human surgeries to develop treatments for his pet patients. He’s performed thousands of operations.

Brito says animal health is his top concern, but beauty also is important to the animal’s well-being. Brito said that if the owner thinks the dog is attractive, the relationship is better.

“Good symmetry is very important,” Brito said. “All that is not symmetric we don’t like.”

One of Brito’s more famous patients is Brutus, a miniature schnauzer imported to Brazil from Argentina. He is gray, sleek and muscular and perfectly groomed.

“Brutus was perfect in all details,” said his owner Anita Alt, except for one. One ear, thanks to a bad ear job from another veterinarian, flopped open. Fearing infection and hoping to show and breed Brutus, Alt turned to Brito five years ago. The doctor injected a substance used to eliminate human wrinkles into the base of Brutus’ ear, which straightened instantly.

“No trauma, and you can see the results immediately,” said Alt, who breeds mini schnauzers. Brutus became a grand champion, retired early, and now lives a happy life as a handsome stud in Sao Paulo.