I am so excited…..

Getting ready as we speak to go pick up Chloe…they told me when I called yesterday that she was too big to be spayed ‘in house’ so she would have to be sent out to another vet which could take awhile…so come get her!(That was the reason she did not come home with me on Tuesday…she was waiting to see the vet and to be spayed) My daughter has taken the day off school in case I need a hand (she is my almost graduated beautiful 18 year old Shelby) Anyways gotta put my scrubby clothes on to wrangle an unknown (to her) super large extremely hairy dog that has not even sniffed me yet…and I am gonna try to shove her in my expedition…lol.
This could be interesting…wish me luck! 🙂

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Back in the saddle ..so to speak :)

Wow…it has been so long since I have posted on this site that it is truly amazing. But I had become obsessed, I was ticking off pet food companies and neglecting my kids so I had to quit.
Here is the 411 on me my husband deploys in July so I will soon be seated once again in front of my computer working on my blog trying to block out the sad fact that my husband and best friend will be gone for 1 year…see y’all soon xoxoxoxo Michele

Houston SPCA caring for dogs seized from filthy trailer

Owner says circling UFOs made the animals unhealthy

By ANITA HASSAN
Copyright 2008 Houston Chronicle

Dec. 13, 2008, 8:56PM

photo
James Nielsen Chronicle

Dr. Dev Rajan, of the Houston SPCA, holds one of the terriers seized from a trailer in Fayette County earlier this month.

Houston SPCA veterinarian Roberta Westbrook lifted a trembling toy English fox terrier into her arms Saturday afternoon to examine the dog’s emaciated body.

The spine and ribs of the malnourished terrier were visible. The dog’s nails were overgrown and her tiny paws were soiled from living in her own feces. The dog was among 42 terriers brought to the Houston SPCA Friday from the Gardenia E. Janssen Animal Shelter in Fayette County.

Authorities in Fayette County seized the dogs on Dec. 3, after they were found living in a 5-by-9 foot trailer — eating, sleeping and giving birth in their own waste — with a woman who claimed the terriers were unhealthy because UFOs were circling above her home, said Houston SPCA spokeswoman Meera Nandlal.

“We don’t know if she was breeding them or why she was living with them in such a small space, ” Nandlal said.

Authorities in Fayette County could not be reached for comment on Saturday. It is unknown at this time if any charges will be brought against the woman.

The animal shelter enlisted the Houston SPCA’s help to house and care for the 40 dogs, some of whom are as old as 10. The terrier Westbrook was examining gave birth to two female puppies since she was removed from the trailer.

Most of the dogs are in poor physical condition. Two of them are missing limbs for unknown reasons.

“They could be purebred, but not the best standard,” Westbrook said.

All the dogs will undergo medical and behavioral evaluations. After being cleaned and treated, healthy dogs will be put up for adoption, Westbrook said, adding that those who need more time to recover will be placed in foster care.

The Houston SPCA often sees many large animal seizures, Nandlal said. Recently, the organization took in 70 feral cats.

“Unfortunately, it’s not unusual, ” she said. “There are all kinds of animals that are put into situations they have no control of.”

Soup kitchen opens up for dogs in Berlin

  • Homeless group
  • Homeless woman with dogs
  • a homeless man with his dog

A soup kitchen for dogs has opened up in Berlin.  The soup kitchen, opened up by Claudia Hollm, is called Animal Board. They provide meals for dogs of the homeless, and also to people who have recently lost their job.  Animal Board is supported by several companies, including makers of animal food.

A soup kitchen exclusively for dogs has opened its doors in Berlin providing pets of the homeless and unemployed with a free meal, the director of the establishment said on Friday.

Despite the looming financial crisis, director Claudia Hollm dismissed criticism that it may be more sensible to collect money for humans than for dogs.

“Nowadays people underestimate dogs. They are incredibly important for those who lack social contact with other humans,” Hollm told Reuters.

“Making sure dogs don’t go hungry is just as important as making sure that people don’t starve,” she added.

Animal Board has been lucky enough to benefit from sponsorship from several companies, including some animal food companies. One woman who used the service for her dogs, cats and her rabbit told a local newspaper:

Without this animal bread line, I’d probably starve to death.

Berlin is currently becoming very animal friendly as last month the city opened a bus service that caters just for dogs, ferrying the animals to and from their day-care centres.

Check out Mark Seibel’s site…

http://doggiestepsdogtraining.wordpress.com/

He is top dog in our book!!!!

Saving the Michael Vick Dogs -must see t.v.

If you missed it last season, here’s your chance.                                                           Be sure to check out this show dedicated to the salvation of the pit bulls that were confiscated from our famous football fiend ‘Michael Vick’

Saving the Michael Vick Dogs

DogTown Dogtown

Returning This September

Saving the Michael Vick Dogs

Remind Me Friday September 5 9P

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Meet the residents of DogTown

DogTown at Best Friends animal sanctuary

DOGS FIND HOMES

Best Friends sanctuary is their last hope. Visit Site

DogTown veternarian Dr. Mike

VET TALK

What it’s like being a vet at DogTown.
Watch Video

NAT GEO NEWSLETTER

Remind Me Friday September 5 9P Friday September 5 8P Friday September 5 7P Friday September 5 9P Friday September 5 8P Friday September 5 6P Back to Series

Trainer’s Diary: Michael Vick Dogs Update

Best Friends Animal Sanctuary's DogTown from the National Geographic Channel show DogTown Dog’s name: Meryl

Trainer’s name: Ann Allums

Initial diagnosis: Fearful of strangers, Meryl may lash out when meeting a new person if not properly introduced.

Training program: First and most important, Meryl is only introduced to new people through people she already trusts so that she does not lash out.  Trainer John Garcia and I have worked rigorously on introducing Meryl to other trainers, so now a number of us have gained her trust. We show her that the people who take care of her won’t hurt her. Additionally, I always seek ways to give Meryl a full and rich life with adoptive owners one day, which begins with learning basic commands such as sit, stay and come, and then moving up to agility training.

Status: Meryl has met new people and has a variety of caregivers who can walk her, play with her and snuggle with her. We practice agility regularly and Meryl loves it. When Meryl sees me coming she gets really excited — good things are going to happen! I also discovered that Meryl loves other dogs and now she has regular play dates with a variety of doggie friends!

Best Friends Animal Sanctuary's DogTown from the National Geographic Channel show DogTownDog’s name: Georgia

Trainer’s name: John Garcia

Initial diagnosis: When I met Georgia, she was very aloof with people, demonstrated food guarding issues and was aggressive to other dogs.

Training program: The first task was to show Georgia that she was loved — that we wouldn’t hurt her, and that in fact we would take care of her and bring good things to her life.  That didn’t take too long! After that, we focused on food guarding.  I started by feeding her by hand so that she had nothing to guard and rewarding her with a bigger treat when I wanted to take another food item away.  She has done a great job. Then we moved to basic commands like sit, stay and come.  I’ve chosen not to address her aggression against other dogs yet.  I don’t blame her for this strong reaction to other dogs after what she’s been through.  For now, if she doesn’t want to be with dogs, that’s fine; we’ll let her be with people — which is what she loves.

Status: Georgia is doing great.  She is enjoying time with me and with her caregivers and hasn’t shown any food guarding issues in a long time.  Plus she’s mastering the basic commands.  She loves her walks, her toys and the people in her life.

Best Friends Animal Sanctuary's DogTown from the National Geographic Channel show DogTownDog’s name: Denzel

Trainer’s name: John Garcia

Initial diagnosis: One of the things I immediately noticed about Denzel was his energy level.  I know from experience that dogs with energy need plenty of exercise, so we would need to include exercise as part of the training program for Denzel.  He would also need a lot of mental and physical stimulation, and we would also have to establish boundaries early on.

Training program: Our training plans for Denzel were put on the shelf for a while because when he arrived at Best Friends, our vets discovered that he had a pretty severe case of anemia and an underlying disease — a tickborne parasite sometimes found in fighting dogs.  It took months to get him on track.  After that, it was on to basic obedience training and getting Denzel ready to pass our Canine Good Citizen test.

Status: Healthy, happy and energetic.  Learning new things every day and getting better and better at following basic commands.

Best Friends Animal Sanctuary's DogTown from the National Geographic Channel show DogTownDog’s name: Cherry

Trainer’s name: Michelle Besmehn

Initial diagnosis: Shy and undersocialized, Cherry flattens to the ground when on a leash and doesn’t want to walk.

Training program: My plan for Cherry was to first get to know him and figure out what causes him stress, what makes him happy and what interests him, and then use those things to help him feel more comfortable and calm. When Cherry first arrived and we clipped a leash to him, he would completely flatten his whole body to the ground and stay motionless.  So one of the first things I did was to carry him outside for his walk and stand there with him, waiting for him to eventually start moving around a little bit on his own.  Even if he sneaked over to a place that he thought was a little safer, maybe near a wall or a fence line, that was an accomplishment because it was his own agenda.  He was still on a leash, but he realized it wasn’t so bad.  And it progressed from there!

Next, we wanted to introduce him to new experiences and help him to realize that not only will he be able to survive new experiences but he may actually be able to enjoy them.  Even touching him made him nervous, but if you started massaging him, he would start to relax. Cherry also seemed very interested in other dogs, so we carefully introduced him to them and found him a friend in Mel to play with, which has really brightened up his outlook on life.

Status: Cherry is becoming a much braver, more confident dog.  He interacts playfully with all of his caregivers and actively seeks our attention.

Sustainable Pet Homes- Go Green

Green Roofs for Animal Homes

Stephanie Rubin, owner and designer of Sustainable Pet Design, fused her love for animals, her talent for landscape design and an environmental responsibility into Greenerrroof Animal Homes.

At the moment her catalog features dog houses and bird homes with green roofs. All dog dens are custom-made according to the size of the dog and the local plant types available for the roof. The cedar wood used is FSC-certified and treated with zero-VOC paint and beeswax for waterproofing. The green roof of each home consists of plants native to where you (and your dog) live. The advantages of green roofs for pets are numerous; they are naturally nice smelling and looking, insulate, attract butterflies and repel fleas. You could even use the naturally filtered runoff water as drinking water for your dog.

Shelters come in various colours and models to choose from; from the Heartbox with a heart-shaped entrance to an impressive Cathedral and a eccentric-looking Leafbox. Now you just have to decide whether you want to spend between $1000 and $6000 on a dog house, (or $300 on a bird house!) and whether your dog is more the romantic or quirky type. It is definitely the greenest, maybe a little over-designed dog home we’ve come across so far… More eco tips for four-legged companions in our How To Green Your Pet Guide. Via: Pets Trends ::Sustainable Pet Design