Houston SPCA caring for dogs seized from filthy trailer

Owner says circling UFOs made the animals unhealthy

By ANITA HASSAN
Copyright 2008 Houston Chronicle

Dec. 13, 2008, 8:56PM

photo
James Nielsen Chronicle

Dr. Dev Rajan, of the Houston SPCA, holds one of the terriers seized from a trailer in Fayette County earlier this month.

Houston SPCA veterinarian Roberta Westbrook lifted a trembling toy English fox terrier into her arms Saturday afternoon to examine the dog’s emaciated body.

The spine and ribs of the malnourished terrier were visible. The dog’s nails were overgrown and her tiny paws were soiled from living in her own feces. The dog was among 42 terriers brought to the Houston SPCA Friday from the Gardenia E. Janssen Animal Shelter in Fayette County.

Authorities in Fayette County seized the dogs on Dec. 3, after they were found living in a 5-by-9 foot trailer — eating, sleeping and giving birth in their own waste — with a woman who claimed the terriers were unhealthy because UFOs were circling above her home, said Houston SPCA spokeswoman Meera Nandlal.

“We don’t know if she was breeding them or why she was living with them in such a small space, ” Nandlal said.

Authorities in Fayette County could not be reached for comment on Saturday. It is unknown at this time if any charges will be brought against the woman.

The animal shelter enlisted the Houston SPCA’s help to house and care for the 40 dogs, some of whom are as old as 10. The terrier Westbrook was examining gave birth to two female puppies since she was removed from the trailer.

Most of the dogs are in poor physical condition. Two of them are missing limbs for unknown reasons.

“They could be purebred, but not the best standard,” Westbrook said.

All the dogs will undergo medical and behavioral evaluations. After being cleaned and treated, healthy dogs will be put up for adoption, Westbrook said, adding that those who need more time to recover will be placed in foster care.

The Houston SPCA often sees many large animal seizures, Nandlal said. Recently, the organization took in 70 feral cats.

“Unfortunately, it’s not unusual, ” she said. “There are all kinds of animals that are put into situations they have no control of.”

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Soup kitchen opens up for dogs in Berlin

  • Homeless group
  • Homeless woman with dogs
  • a homeless man with his dog

A soup kitchen for dogs has opened up in Berlin.  The soup kitchen, opened up by Claudia Hollm, is called Animal Board. They provide meals for dogs of the homeless, and also to people who have recently lost their job.  Animal Board is supported by several companies, including makers of animal food.

A soup kitchen exclusively for dogs has opened its doors in Berlin providing pets of the homeless and unemployed with a free meal, the director of the establishment said on Friday.

Despite the looming financial crisis, director Claudia Hollm dismissed criticism that it may be more sensible to collect money for humans than for dogs.

“Nowadays people underestimate dogs. They are incredibly important for those who lack social contact with other humans,” Hollm told Reuters.

“Making sure dogs don’t go hungry is just as important as making sure that people don’t starve,” she added.

Animal Board has been lucky enough to benefit from sponsorship from several companies, including some animal food companies. One woman who used the service for her dogs, cats and her rabbit told a local newspaper:

Without this animal bread line, I’d probably starve to death.

Berlin is currently becoming very animal friendly as last month the city opened a bus service that caters just for dogs, ferrying the animals to and from their day-care centres.

L.A. -Mandatory sterilization of dogs/cats in effect october 1st

Los Angeles dog and cat owners, time is running out to comply with spay-neuter law
The new city ordinance, requiring most pets over 4 months old to be sterilized, takes effect Oct. 1.

By Carla Hall, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
September 25, 2008
If you’ve been on the L.A. Animal Services website any time in the last couple of months, you know the department maintains a digital countdown of the days, hours, minutes and seconds until the city’s spay/neuter law goes into effect Wednesday.

Now, there’s less than a week to comply with the ordinance requiring most pet cats and dogs in Los Angeles to be sterilized.

There are a number of reduced-cost options for sterilizing your animal. The city’s shelters and many of their private rescue partners offer vouchers — to everyone — worth $30 toward the cost of a sterilization procedure performed by participating veterinarians. Senior citizens, the disabled and low-income residents quality for a certificate for a free procedure at certain veterinary hospitals or a mobile clinic.

Ed Boks, general manager of L.A. Animal Services, also notes that the South L.A. shelter has a spay-neuter clinic and that the Harbor and West L.A. shelters have clinics that will be up and running in two months. Also, as part of a push to get more pets spayed and neutered, a group of organizations is sponsoring the third “Spay Day L.A.” event Oct. 24-26. During those days, certain veterinary facilities will offer free spay services.

The ordinance exempts plenty of dogs and cats: those that have special skills, are being trained for special activities, have medical excuses, are show dogs or whose owners aspire for their animals to join the show circuit.

Otherwise, dogs and cats 4 months and older must be sterilized. Owners found not to be in compliance have 60 days to alter their pets or pay a $100 fine. A third offense results in a $500 fine.

When the Los Angeles City Council approved the measure in February, the hope was that pet sterilization would stem the tide of unwanted and stray animals flowing into shelters. According to the Humane Society of the United States, 3 million to 4 million animals are euthanized in shelters nationwide each year.

Since the L.A. measure was approved, City Controller Laura Chick has released a report — a link to which can be found on her Web list of audits — stating that L.A. Animal Services was ill-prepared to implement or enforce the new law.

Animal control officers, Chick wrote in her report, “stated they currently have difficulty enforcing other ordinances dealing with privately owned pets, such as the leash law, and no one is sure how spay and neuter canvassing or enforcement should occur. The department plans to rely primarily on voluntary compliance.”

Boks issued his response (a link to which can be found on the Animal Services website) saying his department would enforce the measure “to the fullest extent possible. Owners should not conclude that they can avoid compliance without consequence.” Boks said it is not possible to go door to door or patrol streets to enforce the law because he has only 64 animal control officers covering the entire city.

Animal welfare advocates believe there are plenty of reasons to comply voluntarily. As Chick wrote in her report to the mayor: “Spaying and neutering our pet population will significantly reduce unwanted puppies and kittens that are too often euthanized. The Department of Animal Services reported that over 15,000 dogs and cats were killed last year in our city shelters.”

carla.hall@latimes.com

Do you think that it should be mandatory for all pet owners to sterilize their pets, unless they fall under one of the exemptions ? Or, do you think the this is something the government should stay out of ?



Newest Pet Food Recall Alert 9-12-08

Media  Statement

Mars Petcare US Comments on Voluntary Recall of Everson, PA Plant Dry Pet Food Product

September 12, 2008

Today Mars Petcare US announced a voluntary recall of all products produced at its Everson facility beginning February 18, 2008 until July 29, 2008.  The pet food is being recalled because of potential contamination with Salmonella Schwarzengrund. This voluntary recall only affects 31 states in the United States.

“Even though no direct link between products produced at the Everson manufacturing plant and human or pet illness has been made, we are taking this precautionary action to protect pets and their owners.  We are continuing to work collaboratively with the FDA to determine the nature and source of Salmonella Schwarzengrund at the Everson facility, and are committed to making sure our consumers and customers have the information they need regarding our voluntary recall,” said Catherine Woteki, Global Director of Scientific Affairs, Mars, Incorporated.

Mars Petcare US stopped production at the Everson facility on July 29, 2008 when the company was alerted of a possible link between dry pet food produced at the plant and two isolated cases of people infected with Salmonella Schwarzengrund.

In order to avoid any potential risk to pets and their owners, the company initiated an extensive internal investigation to determine the extent of the involvement of the Everson facility in cooperation with the FDA. Ultimately, none of the pet foods found in consumer homes have been determined to contain Salmonella, and there have been no reports of pet illnesses in those households.  However, the strain of Salmonella Schwarzengrund involved in the illnesses has been detected in the company’s Everson facility.

Many of the brands involved in the recall are national brands produced at multiple facilities. For example, the company manufactures PEDIGREE® in numerous facilities throughout the country, and the Everson facility represents a very small portion of the manufacturing base – 2.7 percent of total PEDIGREE® production.

Consumers can continue to have confidence in the quality and safety of the products produced at Mars Petcare US’ other facilities. Only those products which were produced at the Everson facility are impacted.

Mars Petcare US will work with all of its customers to ensure that the recalled products are not on store shelves. These products should not be sold or fed to pets.  In the event that consumers believe they have purchased products affected by this voluntary recall, they should return the product to the store where they purchased it for a full refund.  Specific product details and other information can be found at www.petcare.mars.com.

Catherine Woteki concluded, “Our top priority has always been and continues to be the health and welfare of pets and their owners. At Mars, we hold ourselves to the highest quality standards.”

Everson, Pennsylvania — According to the FDA, Mars has voluntarily recalled a number of pet food products manufacturered at its Everson, Pennsylvania facility.

It is being recalled because of potential contamination with Salmonella serotype Schwarzengrund.

From the FDA:

Salmonella can cause serious infections in dogs and cats, and, if there is cross contamination caused by handling of the pet food, in people as well, especially children, the aged, and people with compromised immune systems.

Healthy people potentially infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Animals can be carriers with no visible symptoms and can potentially infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

The company stopped production at the Everson facility on July 29, 2008 when it was alerted of a possible link between dry pet food produced at the plant and two isolated cases of people infected with Salmonella Schwarzengrund.

Even though no direct link between product produced at Everson and human or pet illness has been made, Mars Petcare US is taking precautionary action to protect pets and their owners by announcing a voluntary recall of all products produced at the Everson facility beginning February 18, 2008 until July 29, 2008.

Since the facility has not yet identified the source of the contamination, Mars Petcare US does not plan to resume production out of a commitment to the safety of pet owners and their pets, customers, and associates.

Many of the brands involved in the recall are national brands produced at multiple facilities. A chart for all products is below. For example, PEDIGREE® is manufactured in numerous facilities throughout the country, and Everson represents a very small portion of the manufacturing base ? 2.7 percent of total PEDIGREE® production.

These products should not be sold or fed to pets. In the event that consumers believe they have purchased products affected by this voluntary recall, they should return the product to the store where they purchased it for a full refund. Specific product details and other information can be found at www.petcare.mars.com.

Please find recalled pet food UPC information below.

The products listed below are made at our Everson facility on behalf of a variety of retailers.

All code dates, with the exception of PEDIGREE®, are listed in a similar format as noted below:

Consumers should look for “17” as the first two digits of the second line. Sample:Best By Feb 18 0917 1445 1

For PEDIGREE® the Everson code date format is as follows:

Consumers should look for “PAE” on the bottom line ? the sixth, seventh and eighth digits. Sample:PEDIGREE ® Small Crunchy BitesBest Before 02/2009808G1PAE01 12:00

In an effort to prevent the transmission of Salmonella from pets to family members and care givers, the FDA recommends that everyone follow appropriate pet food handling guidelines when feeding their pets. A list of safe pet food handling tips can be found at: www.fda.gov/consumer/updates/petfoodtips080307.html

Pet owners who have questions about the recall should call 1-877-568-4463 or visit www.petcare.mars.com.

Recalled Pet Food Note: If you see a product you purchased listed below, please review the code date information samples from above to confirm that your product is included in the recall.

Product Name / Bag Size UPC
Product Name / Bag Size UPC
Country Acres Cat Food 40# 16603 02181
Retriever Bites & Bones Dog Food 8# 79818 96757
Country Acres Ration Dog Food 40# 16603 02333
Retriever Bites & Bones Dog Food 20# 79818 96634
Country Acres 18% Dog Food 40# 16603 02331
Retriever Bites & Bones Dog Food 50# 49394 05666
Country Acres Hi Pro Dog Food 50# 16603 02021
Retriever Gravy Blend Dog Food 50# 49394 05665
Doggy Bag Dog Food 40# 73893 40000
Retriever Gravy Blend Dog Food 8# 79818 96756
Members Mark Complete Nutrition Premium Cat Food 20# 81131 89881
Retriever Hi Protein Dog Food 8# 79818 96755
Members Mark Complete Nutrition Premium Dog Food 50# 05388 67055
Retriever Hi Protein Dog Food 25# 49394 00002
Members Mark Crunchy Bites & Savory Bones Adult Dog Food 50# 05388 67309
Retriever Hi Protein Dog Food 50# 49394 00003
Members Mark High Performance Premium Dog Food 50# 81131 75479
Retriever Mini Chunk Dog Food 8# 79818 96754
Natural Cat Food (Sam’s Club) 15# 81131 89883
Retriever Mini Chunk Dog Food 25# 49394 00006
Natural Dog Food (Sam’s Club) 25# 81131 89884
Retriever Mini Chunk Dog Food 50# 49395 00005
Ol’ Roy Complete Nutrition 4.4# 81131 69377
Retriever Puppy Blend Dog Food 6# 49394 56221
Ol’ Roy Complete Nutrition 8# 05388 67144
Retriever Puppy Blend Dog Food 8# 79818 96758
Ol’ Roy Complete Nutrition 22# 05388 60342
Retriever Puppy Blend Dog Food 20# 49394 00004
Ol’ Roy Complete Nutrition 50# 78742 01022
Retriever Puppy Blend Dog Food 40# 79818 96706
Ol’ Roy High Performance Nutrition Dog Food 20# 05388 60345
Special Kitty Gourmet 3.5# 81131 17546
Ol’ Roy High Performance Nutrition Dog Food 50# 78742 05815
Special Kitty Gourmet 4# 78742 53199
Ol’ Roy Meaty Chunks ‘n Gravy Dog Food 8# 81131 69629
Special Kitty Gourmet 7# 81131 17547
Ol’ Roy Meaty Chunks ‘n Gravy Dog Food 22# 81131 69630
Special Kitty Gourmet 8# 78742 53200
Ol’ Roy Meaty Chunks ‘n Gravy Dog Food 50# 81131 69631
Special Kitty Gourmet 18# 81131 15748
Ol’ Roy Puppy Complete 4# 81131 79078
Special Kitty Gourmet 20# 78742 53201
Ol’ Roy Puppy Complete 8# 81131 79079
Special Kitty Gourmet 25# 78742 54314
Ol’ Roy Puppy Complete 20# 81131 79080
Special Kitty Kitten 3.5# 81131 17553
Paws & Claws Delicious Mix Cat Food 8# 79818 96632
Special Kitty Kitten 4# 78742 53198
Paws & Claws Delicious Mix Cat Food 20# 49394 05746
Special Kitty Kitten 7# 81131 17554
Paws & Claws Delicious Mix Cat Food 40# 79818 96676
Special Kitty Kitten 8# 81131 24739
Paws & Claws Premium Choice Cat Food 8# 79818 96633
Special Kitty Original 3.5# 81131 17557
Paws & Claws Premium Choice Cat Food 20# 49394 00008
Special Kitty Original 4# 78742 04930
Paws & Claws Premium Choice Cat Food 40# 49394 05747
Special Kitty Original 7# 81131 17562
Pedigree Large Breed Adult Nutrition 20# 23100 29158
Special Kitty Original 8# 78742 05744
Pedigree Large Breed Adult Nutrition 30.1# 23100 31484
Special Kitty Original 18# 81131 17559
Pedigree Large Breed Adult Nutrition 36.4# 23100 31479
Special Kitty Original 20# 78742 05794
Pedigree Large Breed Adult Nutrition 40# 23100 29154
Special Kitty Original 25# 81131 68869
Pedigree Small Crunchy Bites Adult Nutrition 4.4# 23100 05104
Wegman’s Bruiser Complete Nutrition Dog Food 4.4# 77890 33654
Pedigree Small Crunchy Bites Adult Nutrition 8.8# 23100 05103
Wegman’s Bruiser Complete Nutrition Dog Food 20# 77890 32988
Pedigree Small Crunchy Bites Adult Nutrition 20# 23100 14719
Wegman’s Bruiser Complete Nutrition Dog Food 37.5# 77890 32994
Pedigree Small Crunchy Bites Adult Nutrition 32# 23100 31483
Wegman’s Bruiser Puppy Dog Food 4.4# 77890 33621
Pedigree Small Crunchy Bites Adult Nutrition 40# 23100 31478
Wegman’s Bruiser Puppy Dog Food 17.6# 77890 32991
Pedigree Small Crunchy Bites Adult Nutrition 44# 23100 05100
Wegman’s Bruiser Small Crunchy Bites Dog Food 4.4# 77890 33618
Pedigree Small Crunchy Bites Adult Nutrition 52# 23100 05110
Wegman’s Bruiser Small Crunchy Bites Dog Food 20# 77890 32982
Pet Pride Indoor Cat 3.5# 11110 74584
Wegman’s Buju & Ziggie Complete Cat Food 3.5# 77890 10005
Pet Pride Indoor Cat 18# 11110 74585
Wegman’s Buju & Ziggie Complete Cat Food 18# 77890 10004
Pet Pride Weight Management Dog Food 17.6# 11110 74578
Wegman’s Buju & Ziggie Indoor Cat Food 3.5# 77890 12038
PMI Nutrition Bites & Bones Dog Food 50# 42869 00174
Wegman’s Buju & Ziggie Indoor Cat Food 18# 77890 12039
PMI Nutrition Canine Advantage 50# 42869 00172
Wegman’s Buju & Ziggie Kitten 3.5# 77890 12036
PMI Nutrition Feline Medley 20# 42869 00171
Wegman’s Buju & Ziggie Original Medley Cat Food 3.5# 77890 10006
PMI Nutrition Gravy Crunches Dog Food 40# 42869 00033
Wegman’s Buju & Ziggie Original Medley Cat Food 18# 77890 10003
Red Flannel Active Formula Dog Food 40# 42869 00063
Red Flannel Adult Formula Dog Food 20# 42869 00055
Red Flannel Adult Formula Dog Food 40# 42869 00054
Red Flannel Canine Select Dog Food 20# 42869 00068
Red Flannel Canine Select Dog Food 40# 42869 00067
Red Flannel Cat 10# 42869 00059
Red Flannel Cat 20# 42869 00058
Red Flannel Hi Pro Formula Dog Food 50# 42869 00065
Red Flannel Prime Dog Food 25# 42869 00052
Red Flannel Prime Dog Food 50# 42869 00053
Red Flannel Puppy 40# 42869 00056

#

Why Do East Asians Eat Dog/Cat meat?

This is an article on a subject that I believe mystifies many Americans actually let me expand that to many ‘North Americans’ (I personally am a Canadian so I can’t leave them out now can I…eh? 🙂 )

I myself, have been doing quite a bit of research on the subject. However, I honestly do not think I could do a better job of presenting it than the Author of the article below.

So I am not going to try…

Why Do East Asians Eat Dog/Cat meat?
by calsifer

(If you find this post informative, you might like to check out these.)
Thinking about Helping China’s Animals, I remembered a lengthy ramble I wrote to a friend in America who asked in Dec 2005:

“Can you tell me why the Chinese and or some Asians still eat dogs and cats? I don’t understand. I am a naive American and to me it is awful but perhaps cultures don’t mix but omnivores eating omnivores (dogs) and carnivores (cats) just seem physically (not to mention morally) wrong no matter what.

CNN just did a video expose on the “Markets of Misery” and it was heartbreaking. My pet cats are my “children” and mean the world to me and I would die to save them from any danger.”

I shared my thoughts on this topic with her and this is what I wrote:

As to your question on why Asians eat dogs and cats – bear with me as I try to reason my way through it… not that I myself understand or approve… but i’ll try to give as objective a view as I can.

Before I go on, I’d like to say that though I’m ethnically Chinese, I’m not a China Chinese, Singapore is quite a country apart from China, Taiwan, Hong Kong etc as a sovereign state, so I may not be able to give you an accurate view of how it really is. Anyway, I’m not totally into the Chinese Gastro-Culture thing… don’t think I ever will! Esp seeing as i’ve turned veghead =P.

Anyway, here goes:

I’m sure you already know that Asians have a reputation/penchant for so-called “exotic” foods. This is much like the French with their taste for fine food, esp things like foie gras, or the italians with their taste for veal. To me, there’s no difference in the human obsession with food, whatever their race or nationality. It just seems funny to me that the highlight is skewed on Asian eating when every country where this sort of thing goes on, whether it is dogs, cats, geese, or cows and calves that suffer the brutality, should be censured.

Anyway, as for Asians, I will try to tell you more about the Chinese gastronomical philosophy. The Chinese, and to a very large extent, the east asian cultures of Japan, Korea too, have very elaborate systems and schools of thought about food. They are also very very proud of their gastro-cultural heritage.

East Asians believe in the therapeutic values of certain foods, for the Chinese esp, and they even have a whole thing about nourishment according to shape/similarity in function of a specific part. EG rhino horn, tiger penis, deer penis for aphrodisiacs, pig brains for boosting brain power, bear bile for fever, etc. There is also a culture of appreciation for “fine/exotic food” – sharksfin, abalone, live monkey brain, live bear paws. In addition, there is another, yes, another, thing about eating food according to seasons. For the Chinese, “cooling food” like fruits or maybe cold meat dishes, deer antler shavings in summer, and “warming food” in winter, like dogmeat, wildgame etc. (I confess that I do not understand where catmeat figure in this, but I susepct in the warming food category.)

In particular, the Cantonese dialect group – the province of Guangdong/Canton, next to Hong Kong – who are the emperors of Chinese gastro-culture, like the French for the Western world, are the ones with their heads in gastronomical “heaven”, which means bleeding hell for animals, is the most fervent about food. (Guangdong is also where most of the exotic food culture exists, and extends out from there to other parts of China. This is also where most of the videos of the dog and cat meat markets are shot.)

Of course, this gastro-culture has been condemned worldwide. But so? To date, it still goes on. It has also led to and encouraged poaching of exotics – tigers, leopards, bears, rhinos, sharks. If it’s something edible, you can bet that someone in China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and maybe even Japan, and Korea will pay for it. In addition, don’t forget that the Chinese have a presence in almost every other country as immigrants. The extent of the damage of this gastroculture, is, imho, nightmarish.

In 2003, SARS started from Guangdong, spread to Hong Kong, and was carried into Singapore by a stewardess. The cause in Guangdong was believed to be the Cantonese penchant for wild game, and it was narrowed down to civet cats. Thus began an extermination drive of civet cats already in the market place – inhumane methods like boiling, electrocution, drowning in chemicals (some live drowning footage was shown on the local news so this is not hearsay)… civet cat meat was banned, and so was exotic meat trapping, and the exotic meat markets quietened down considerably… but that lasted about as long as a droplet of sneeze stays airborne. By late 2003, the meat markets were back in full blossom. And in Singapore, the government jumped at the mere mention of a possibility of SARS transmission by cats, and ordered an end to our national TnRM programme, which was just barely 5 yrs old, and began culling cats in earnest. That year, the official stray culling bill was SGD$600,000, SGD$100,000 more than the yearly average. Like many cat-caregivers, my sister and I lost a few cats we cared for, all on the whim of a fear.

In case my statement about me not being a China-Chinese leads you to think that things are rosy here in Singapore – here’s a few facts to show that Singapore is as bad, if not worse than the rest of Asia: (1) we are the largest trade center for sharksfin (2) as a trading hub, smuggling and the illegal wildlife trade has a big presence here too, (though not as rampant as Thailand) – there has been cases of raids and consfication of illegally smuggled animals for export or sales/consumption locally (3) A friend also told me how a colleague was extolling the great taste of the live-monkey brain she had in Hong Kong just last year (4) This year, there was a newspaper feature about a local man who has set up a hunting club and there was even a link to his site where he displayed the trophy photos of him and his cohorts on hunting trips to Africa – he makes a living organising these murder sprees too (5) Our anti-animal smuggling/illegal trade laws are too lenient – punishment is for per/species, and no sentence has ever even come close to the max punishment of a max fine of SGD$10,000 and jail term of 1 yr. NEVER.

Further afield, another one of my pet rant is the whale-hunting sham of the Japanese. One strange thing about the Japanese and eating whales is that whales were not a traditional part of the Japanese gastro-culture. Apparently, whale meat became popular in Japan after the economic collapse casued by WWII. Their defense of their right to eat whale as tradition, is in short, a load of bull. The Koreans too, have a thing for whale meat, whether this is influenced by the Japanese, who ruled them as a colony until early the 1900s, I’m not sure.

Back to your question about why cats and dogs for Asians. With cats, East Asians, apart from the Japanese I believe, did not have as cosy a relationship like Europeans and Americans have, ie they were not popular as pets until recent history. Incidentally, there is also a very common misconception that Malays are great cat lovers, but that’s another, much more sensitive topic. As for dogs… well… traditionally they are viewed more as working animals, property like any other object, or livestock.

Actually you know what? Whether cats, dogs, geese or other animals, I think it boils down to what I believed is called the human disconnect mentality. Like our attitude towards factory farming – we know it is morally wrong to treat animals the way they’ve been, especially cows, pigs, goats, chickens ducks, and other everyday food animals. But it still goes on – because we allow it to. And we can allow it go on, because we’re disconnected from the reality of the factoryfarm and the assembly process slaughter-houses.

And speaking of exotic food, how about bushmeat… Africans eat gorillas, and other primates. In Asia too the same is happening to the Orang Utans, the only great ape to be found in Asia. The Malaysians, and Indonesian kill Orangutans, eat them, sell their babies, in addition to destroying their habitat – like Gorillas, orang utans are not expected to survive long unless things change – the orangs have only another 5, maybe 10 years in the best of scenarios.

To be fair, and I am saying this objectively, there are also many people who do not eat meat at all – vegetarianism is a big part of being devout Buddhists and Taoists (except Japan where I understand the concept of total meat abstinence does not exist). There are others who are against the cruelties in Asia on moral grounds, though the number is small.

But people are working against the horrors of Asian gastro-culture. For example, bearbile farm rescue, anti-dog/cat meat eating campaigns in Korea and China and so on. There’s so much to fight against, and so little headway achieved – fighting against the largest continent of humans with thousands of years of gastro-pride is no mean feat. But there are people working on it. I just wish more people will acknowledge the cruelties perpetuated in their names and for their sakes! Visit this site and scroll down to for a list of some animal-welfare/activist groups in Asia fighting the fight:
http://acres.org.sg/links.html

WELL! I’ve been rambling… sorry for that. I do hope your patience hasn’t run out, and that you did find something useful in all that verbage =)

(If you find this post informative, you might like to check out these.)

Filed under: Abuse and Cruelty, Animals, Asia, Cats, China, Dogs, News, Pets, Rambling / Minion wunderings, SARS, Singapore | Tagged: cat meat, cruelty, cuisine, dog meat, east asian, exotic foods, society