Unchain Your Dog

Unchain Your Dog

Unchain Your Dog

Dogs are born as part of a pack. Out in the wild, wolves and other canines live, eat, and sleep with their family. Without other dogs, humans become their “pack.” If someone chained you to a tree and you could only travel a few feet wouldn’t you feel sad? A chained dog feels rejected and doesn’t understand why their best friend would just walk away and leave them there.

Imagine yourself being chained to a tree year after year. You watch the door hoping someone will come play. No one ever does. You long to run, but you can only pace. You shiver in winter and pant in summer. Eventually, you stop barking. You have given up hope.

We have many forms of entertainment: movies, music, friends. Your dog only has YOU. If you can’t give a dog a good life, should you really have one?

It is up to caring people like you to improve the lives of chained dogs. Some think, “It’s none of my business.” But it is the business of compassionate people to speak up when living creatures are treated like objects and chained to a tree. You will feel good about yourself for helping a chained dog!

If you are wondering what should you do if you see a dog constantly left outside on a chain you can read what the Humane Society says about it here.

Here is a list of alternatives the HSUS has to offer to help get dogs off of chains.

  • Install a fence if your property does not already have one. Or consider installing a large chain-link dog run. If you install a dog run, make sure it meets these minimum space requirements. Be sure to allow extra space for a doghouse.
  • If you have a fence and your dog can jump over it, install a 45-degree inward extension to the top of your existing fence. Many home improvement stores sell these extensions.
  • If your dog digs under the fence to escape your yard, bury chicken wire to a depth of one foot below where the fence meets the ground (be sure to bend in the sharp edges). Or place large rocks at the base of the fence.
  • If the two previous options don’t work for your “escape artist,” consider using a cable runner or electronic fencing. These options are not perfect, but they will give your dog more freedom. Be sure to use these options only if you also have a fence that protects your dog from people and other animals.
  • If your dog digs where you don’t want him to (such as in a garden or flower bed), consider putting plastic garden fencing or a similar barrier around the area. Or provide your dog with his own sandbox. Bury toys in the sandbox and use positive reinforcement to teach your dog that it is okay to dig there.
  • Enroll your dog in an obedience class—especially if his behavior is the main reason you keep your dog outside.
  • Spay or neuter your dog if you haven’t already done so. A neutered dog is less likely to roam and more content to stay at home. These are safe procedures that have many health and behavioral benefits. Ask your veterinarian for more information.

Remember that dog behavior problems such as barking, chewing, and digging are often the result of a lack of stimulation. By providing your dog with proper toys, exercise, “people time,” and positive reinforcement, you may alter undesirable behaviors and teach acceptable house manners. In addition, a dog who is inside the house is much more likely to deter an intruder than a dog chained in the yard.

Please help us unchain your dog and give all animals a better life.

Unchain YourDog

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