Dog Names

200 Random Dog Names

CHOPSTICKS  RUBY  BUGINARUG  HOWARD  HIPPO  TORO  DOGZILLA  TURBO  THORN  STREGA  THAI  TATTERS  CAMELOT  MIDAS  JELLY-BELLY  ROOSTER  BARTHOLOMEW  JUSTUS  PISTOL  WHISPER or  CHANTILLY  RICKY-TICKY  CAMEO  DUNCAN  SARASOTA  AMABLE  HUNTRESS  SINBAD  PAWS  GINSENG  NISTKA  CHAUFFEUR  KOOL  SPUMANTI  CHABLIS  AURORA  GURU  AUDACITY  BOZO  MU SHU  BACI  GEEKIE  PORTLY  ADMIRAL  JULIET  KEWPIE  CHIQUITA  PETIT ANGE  STOWAWAY  SPARKEY or  SOUEEE  RUMPELSTILT  MULBERRY  URCHIN  CHARADE  NITRO  TITAN  MUGSY  CLEO  RHONE  SPADES  CONGA  ISIS  RASCAL  MAFIOSO  SNOOKER  FATSO  EXCALIBUR  ULANOVA  BUCKAROO  RUFF  GULLIVER  BAJA  ANAIS  SCOUNDREL  MOUTON  ROCKET  MIRÓ  AMIGO  MOHAVE  CAGNEY  KLUTZ  SAMMY  ELVIRA  HOLLY  CABOOSE  RAGMOP  FLICKER  WILSON  ROCK  RAVEL  TOOTER  JUDGE  MAYNARD  WINDY  TINMAN  SHREDDER  CHOCOLATE  TAFFY  PANTHER  SHOOTER  SLATE  BRITTANY  GOOCH  SCHNAPPS  ZEBU  GUNG HO  ENCHILADA  MAYA  BOLL WEEVIL  ESPRIT  PINOCCHIO  GODZILLA  GUINEVERE  TAZER  ARCHIE  CHIP  JUPITER  LOVEY  CUERVO  ATOM  MACHETE  IOTA  ZODIAC  PUPA  PEASEBLOSSO  C.E.O.  RAISIN  GUMBO  CHEWY  GINGERSNAP  IGOR  VICHYSSOISE  SOPHIE  DESDEMONA  STRAY  SNORTER  FURFACE  GARLIC  NISSAN  HANNIBAL (t  SAVAGE  CURRY  GERTRUDE  COLA  TRICKY  JETHRO  HANSEL  SORBET  DUN  SAVERNAKE  WARHOL  SHANGRI-LA  GIDDY  BEAMER  FEDORA  JAZZ  TWINKLE  MAX  BAYOU  BABBIT  SCOUT  OZ  MATTIE  BOOTS  ALJA  SPUDS  DOTS  MOONSHINE  BADGER  COLT  MOOCHY  BUZZ  DAZZLER  BALBOA  SERGEANT  MARASCHINO  FLURRY  FLETCH  TINKLE BELL  RHETT  BUCKO  ZERO  SPIDER  SCARBOROUGH  REDBEARD  CHANEL  CAESAR  WITCH  RUSTY  CHAYA  ALPINE  BEETHOVEN  HONKY-TONK  BARBARINO  HARMONY  GOBBLE  VALENTINE  MARTINI  ERROL 

Dogs Detecting Termites

By Peggy Ussery

Cody barks excitedly at the sight of his red rubber Kong dog toy.

“This is what he lives for,” said Josh Jones, Cody’s owner. “This is his life.”

Jones uses a high-pitched voice to entice Cody into working. Find it, find it, find it, Jones repeats as he uses his hand to direct the 4-year-old sheltie. Cody sniffs and sniffs again. Find it, find it, find it. Cody sits. Show me, Jones commands. Cody nudges in the direction of a straw basket.

He found it — a bottle full of termites. Cody gets the Kong.

The sheltie is one of about 50 termite detection dogs around the country. Jones bought the dog more than a year ago from a training facility in Austin, Texas. Like narcotic, arson, bomb and other detection canines, Cody works by scent. Except in his case, it’s the scent put off by live termites.

“I had done the research and saw how effective they were,” said Jones, owner of C.O.P.S. (Customer Oriented Pest Services), a pest control company in Enterprise.

Is this for real? Yes.

Entomologists at the University of Florida in Gainesville have actually spent 10 years studying termite detection dogs. There’s even an association — the National Entomology Scent Detection Canine Association — that keeps a listing of training facilities and accredited “teams.”

Phil Koehler, professor of entomology at the University of Florida, said research shows dogs properly trained are more than 90 percent accurate in finding termites. In some cases, the dogs’ accuracy rate is as high as 96 percent. They had such impressive results on termites, the university’s entomology department began studying how effective scent detection dogs could be in finding bed bugs.

“The dogs are actually phenomenal,” Koehler said.

Typically, beagles and labrador retrievers are used for termite detection. As a sheltie, Cody is rare in termite detection and was being trained for arson detection when he showed a tendency for finding termites. Koehler said the university studies dogs trained with food.

Basically, the dogs don’t eat unless termites are nearby so they associate the scent of termites with food.

How such dogs are trained is important, Koehler said. A dog trained on wood with termite damage, for instance, might go into a home and hit on past termite damage even though live termites are not present. To minimize the risk of false positives, university entomologists use live termites and mix in cockroaches and ants to ensure the dogs can recognize different insect scents.

“That way when the dog finds termites, you know it’s an active infestation,” Koehler said.

Cindy Mannes, vice president of public affairs for National Pest Management Association, said termite dogs are expensive to purchase and maintain. And owners must be committed to training the dogs on a regular basis.

Mannes said termite detection dogs should be used with visual inspections by a licensed technician.

“We don’t recommend only one way for anything,” Mannes said. “We do know that there are termite inspection dogs out there … and as I understand they are relatively successful. To me, it’s another tool in our tool box.”

Cody could sniff out a single termite during his training, but Jones said the local response to a termite-sniffing dog has not been what he expected. People tend to think it’s an advertising gimmick. But with $7,000 invested in the sheltie, Jones hopes to use the dog more. Cody has mostly been used on existing contracts and renewals. There’s no extra charge for Cody’s nose.

When properly trained, however, Jones said the sheltie can detect termites before the bugs are even visible.

“Maybe he’s got a little bit of Lab in him,” Jones said.

Helping the Shy or Fearful Dog

Helping the Shy or Fearful Dog

Fearful dogs avoid people or things that frighten them, may seem depressed or disinterested and sometimes lunge or do a barking display to make what they’re afraid of go further away. If you’ve decided to share your life with a shy dog, take heart. The following information can help you understand what he is feeling and give you ways to help him get better.

Different Kinds of Shyness  

The most common kinds of shyness in dogs are:

 

Social shyness, where the dog is fearful of unfamiliar people or certain kinds of people. Dogs like this are sometimes described as “taking a while to warm up,” “one man dogs” or “protective.” They are usually fine with a certain person once they get to know them. Examples are dogs who are afraid of men or big men or men with beards, dogs who are uncomfortable around children, and dogs who bark at the sight of people with unusual gaits. Dogs can also be shy with other dogs.

Context fears, where the dog is afraid of certain kinds of situations. Examples are dogs who are afraid of going to the vet, panic during car rides or are uncomfortable in new places.

Sound sensitivities, where the dog is afraid of sudden loud noises. These dogs flatten and try to escape when a car backfires, or pace and salivate during thunderstorms or fireworks.

Why Is He Like This?

 

Fear is very common in all animals. Although it’s possible that a fearful dog has suffered abuse or a bad experience, most of the time fears result from a 

 

combination of a genetic predisposition and some lack of experience, especially in the first months of life. For instance, a dog may have missed out on becoming socialized to certain kinds of people by simply not being around them enough when he was a puppy.

Will He Get Better?

Most fearful dogs can be helped to gradually improve. This is a long, slow process in most cases and requires patience. Shy dogs are not for everybody. They need caretakers who have compassion and perseverance.

What Can I Do?

The best thing for a fearful dog is to expose him to what frightens him but at a

milder intensity and combined with a fun or positive association.

  So, a dog who is afraid of children might start to feel more comfortable if he regularly sees children but at a distance where he doesn’t feel too worried. Then, if his guardian praises, pats him and gives him treats after the dog has noticed the kids, the dog might start to see the kids as good news: “Wow, great things happen to me when kids are around!”

A dog who is afraid of traffic would benefit from audiotapes of traffic sounds, time spent near quieter streets, all combined with games, treats and happy talk from his guardian. As the dog improves, time can be spent on busier and busier streets. Dogs learn strongly from association. 

How Can I Help My Shy Dog Settle into His New Home?

The best possible strategy is to let the dog go at his own pace. Any kind of pressure or coercion to make contact usually makes things worse. Let the dog hide if he needs to, investigate things and come to you when he feels ready. Avoid as many negative experiences as possible early on. With time, your shy dog will bond to you and get used to his new surroundings.

The San Francisco SPCA Behavior and Training Department
 
 

 

Helping the Shy or Fearful Dog

Helping the Shy or Fearful Dog

Fearful dogs avoid people or things that frighten them, may seem depressed or disinterested and sometimes lunge or do a barking display to make what they’re afraid of go further away. If you’ve decided to share your life with a shy dog, take heart. The following information can help you understand what he is feeling and give you ways to help him get better.

Different Kinds of Shyness  

The most common kinds of shyness in dogs are:

 

Social shyness, where the dog is fearful of unfamiliar people or certain kinds of people. Dogs like this are sometimes described as “taking a while to warm up,” “one man dogs” or “protective.” They are usually fine with a certain person once they get to know them. Examples are dogs who are afraid of men or big men or men with beards, dogs who are uncomfortable around children, and dogs who bark at the sight of people with unusual gaits. Dogs can also be shy with other dogs.

Context fears, where the dog is afraid of certain kinds of situations. Examples are dogs who are afraid of going to the vet, panic during car rides or are uncomfortable in new places.

Sound sensitivities, where the dog is afraid of sudden loud noises. These dogs flatten and try to escape when a car backfires, or pace and salivate during thunderstorms or fireworks.

Why Is He Like This?

 

Fear is very common in all animals. Although it’s possible that a fearful dog has suffered abuse or a bad experience, most of the time fears result from a 

 

combination of a genetic predisposition and some lack of experience, especially in the first months of life. For instance, a dog may have missed out on becoming socialized to certain kinds of people by simply not being around them enough when he was a puppy.

Will He Get Better?

Most fearful dogs can be helped to gradually improve. This is a long, slow process in most cases and requires patience. Shy dogs are not for everybody. They need caretakers who have compassion and perseverance.

What Can I Do?

The best thing for a fearful dog is to expose him to what frightens him but at a

milder intensity and combined with a fun or positive association.

  So, a dog who is afraid of children might start to feel more comfortable if he regularly sees children but at a distance where he doesn’t feel too worried. Then, if his guardian praises, pats him and gives him treats after the dog has noticed the kids, the dog might start to see the kids as good news: “Wow, great things happen to me when kids are around!”

A dog who is afraid of traffic would benefit from audiotapes of traffic sounds, time spent near quieter streets, all combined with games, treats and happy talk from his guardian. As the dog improves, time can be spent on busier and busier streets. Dogs learn strongly from association. 

How Can I Help My Shy Dog Settle into His New Home?

The best possible strategy is to let the dog go at his own pace. Any kind of pressure or coercion to make contact usually makes things worse. Let the dog hide if he needs to, investigate things and come to you when he feels ready. Avoid as many negative experiences as possible early on. With time, your shy dog will bond to you and get used to his new surroundings.

The San Francisco SPCA Behavior and Training Department