A face-lift for a dog? Brazilian vet does it all

‘Good symmetry is very important’

By MEI-LING HOPGOOD
COX NEWS SERVICE

SAO PAULO, Brazil — Is Fido in need of a face-lift?

Go see Edgado Brito, who is advancing the practice of pet plastic surgery in a land with a worldwide reputation for making people beautiful by any means.

Brazilians have long been known for their penchant for cosmetic surgery, and Brito has been adapting those techniques for use on animals.

“Plastic surgery is good for dogs!” said Brito, 45, a Doberman breeder who has worked as a veterinarian for 20 years.

He can make protruding ears droop and uses Metacril to straighten bent ears. He uses Botox to fix inverted eyelashes. He has even tightened the mammillae of a couple of female dogs, whose owners wanted to show them after they had given birth.

Simple surgeries usually cost from about $100 to $200.

In Brazil, the United States and Europe, pet plastic surgery is increasingly in demand, despite objections from animal rights activists and some dog breeders.

The American Kennel Club, which sets the rules for the recognized breeds on the U.S. dog-show circuit, prohibits any surgery that alters a dog’s appearance, other than the cropping of ears and tails to meet breed standards.

But the prohibition on surgery is difficult to define and enforce. Two years ago, an award-winning Pekingese in Britain was the subject of an inquiry when rumors swirled that its face had been surgically enhanced. The dog and its owners were acquitted and allowed to keep the award from the 2003 Crufts Dog Show.

In Brazil, Brito keeps abreast of human plastic-surgery trends and attends human surgeries to develop treatments for his pet patients. He’s performed thousands of operations.

Brito says animal health is his top concern, but beauty also is important to the animal’s well-being. Brito said that if the owner thinks the dog is attractive, the relationship is better.

“Good symmetry is very important,” Brito said. “All that is not symmetric we don’t like.”

One of Brito’s more famous patients is Brutus, a miniature schnauzer imported to Brazil from Argentina. He is gray, sleek and muscular and perfectly groomed.

“Brutus was perfect in all details,” said his owner Anita Alt, except for one. One ear, thanks to a bad ear job from another veterinarian, flopped open. Fearing infection and hoping to show and breed Brutus, Alt turned to Brito five years ago. The doctor injected a substance used to eliminate human wrinkles into the base of Brutus’ ear, which straightened instantly.

“No trauma, and you can see the results immediately,” said Alt, who breeds mini schnauzers. Brutus became a grand champion, retired early, and now lives a happy life as a handsome stud in Sao Paulo.

Governor signs dogfighting bill

Governor signs dogfighting bill
Makes it illegal to train, transport, sell or own a fighting dog


The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Published on: 05/06/08

Five months after Atlanta Falcons star Michael Vick was sentenced to prison for his involvement in dog fighting, Gov. Sonny Perdue signed legislation Tuesday stiffening Georgia’s dog-fighting laws.
Georgia has had among the weakest dog-fighting laws in the country, according to the Humane Society of the United States. The new law makes it illegal to train, transport, sell or own a fighting dog. It also will be illegal to promote or advertise a fight and to attend a dog fight.
Involvement in the dog-fighting business will be a felony, while attending a dog fight will be a high and aggravated misdemeanor on the first offense. It will be a felony on a second offense.

Perdue, a veterinarian, called dog fighting a “repulsive, senseless organized crime.

“Over the past year there has been a bright spotlight shining on a sad situation … the bloody, brutal world of dog fighting,” Perdue said. “It’s not a sport, it’s really barbarism.

“This sends a very clear message that it will not be tolerated in Georgia.”

Perdue signed the bill with a couple of K-9 police dogs looking on.

Vick pleaded guilty Aug. 27 to a federal dogfighting conspiracy charge and was sentenced Dec. 10 to 23 months in prison.

Sen. Chip Rogers (R-Woodstock), who has unsuccessfully sponsored dog-fighting legislation the past few years, said the new law would have passed during the 2008 legislative session even without the Vick case. However, Rogers added, “He certainly helped us push it over the goal line.”

Rep. Bobby Reese (R-Sugar Hill), the House sponsor of the dog-fighting legislation, said, “With the Michael Vick thing, it just educated the public. We were going to get it done this year.”

 

 

Man’s best friend is an enemy of terrorism – bomb-sniffing dogs

The employment situation looks downright rosy in some quarters for the foreseeable future–at least that’s if you happen to be a dog, particularly a German or Belgian shepherd, or a Chesapeake Bay, golden or Labrador retriever or some other sporting breed. Those are the ones best-suited for bomb detection. As 2002 came to a close, the Transportation Security Administration was rushing bomb-sniffing dogs to major airports facing shutdown because they were unable to meet the Dec. 31 deadline for screening all baggage. The government dogs receive 11 weeks of training at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas before being assigned to a handler. Congress authorized spending $6 million on the program after the Sept. 11,2001, terrorist attacks. Federal officials expect to have bomb-sniffing dogs on duty at 83 airports in the United States by the end of the new year. That means employment for more than 300 dogs.
Airport duty is just one area where the dogs are in demand. Police departments nationwide are acquiring them to assist when there’s a bomb threat or suspicious package. Industry, business and institutions such as museums also are looking for a few good dogs. The good ones don’t come cheap: One of the best private trainers sells his dogs for $10,000. Candidates for his training program, Labradors for instance, cost $800 to $2,500 when purchased from a breeder.

Recently in the Philippines, a furor erupted around estimates that purchasing and training bomb-sniffing dogs would cost $83,000 each. Estimates were revised substantially after lawmakers had a field day blasting the project. One factor in the estimate was that local dogs had failed to perform, so officials were looking to acquire some top-of-the-line pooches, such as German shepherds bred in elite European kennels.

The California Highway Patrol (CHP) could offer a little advice to those who are paying high prices for dogs. Officers have saved a dozen dogs in animal-rescue shelters and enrolled them in bomb-sniffer training programs. The CHP has had a similar program in place for years to recruit drug-sniffing dogs. Also in California, a private group has organized “Pups for Peace,” a program that hopes to send 1,000 trained bomb-sniffing dogs to Israel. Dogs in that program are purchased, donated or rescued from shelters.

While breeders and trainers see a great future for dogs in bomb detection, researchers are working to replace them with a high-tech gadget. Bomb-detection devices at present are expensive and cumbersome, but it probably is only a matter of time before some wizard comes up with a cheap, hand-held device.
Article Obtained From; http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1571/is_3_19/ai_96893649

Man’s best friend is an enemy of terrorism – bomb-sniffing dogs

The employment situation looks downright rosy in some quarters for the foreseeable future–at least that’s if you happen to be a dog, particularly a German or Belgian shepherd, or a Chesapeake Bay, golden or Labrador retriever or some other sporting breed. Those are the ones best-suited for bomb detection. As 2002 came to a close, the Transportation Security Administration was rushing bomb-sniffing dogs to major airports facing shutdown because they were unable to meet the Dec. 31 deadline for screening all baggage. The government dogs receive 11 weeks of training at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas before being assigned to a handler. Congress authorized spending $6 million on the program after the Sept. 11,2001, terrorist attacks. Federal officials expect to have bomb-sniffing dogs on duty at 83 airports in the United States by the end of the new year. That means employment for more than 300 dogs.
Airport duty is just one area where the dogs are in demand. Police departments nationwide are acquiring them to assist when there’s a bomb threat or suspicious package. Industry, business and institutions such as museums also are looking for a few good dogs. The good ones don’t come cheap: One of the best private trainers sells his dogs for $10,000. Candidates for his training program, Labradors for instance, cost $800 to $2,500 when purchased from a breeder.

Recently in the Philippines, a furor erupted around estimates that purchasing and training bomb-sniffing dogs would cost $83,000 each. Estimates were revised substantially after lawmakers had a field day blasting the project. One factor in the estimate was that local dogs had failed to perform, so officials were looking to acquire some top-of-the-line pooches, such as German shepherds bred in elite European kennels.

The California Highway Patrol (CHP) could offer a little advice to those who are paying high prices for dogs. Officers have saved a dozen dogs in animal-rescue shelters and enrolled them in bomb-sniffer training programs. The CHP has had a similar program in place for years to recruit drug-sniffing dogs. Also in California, a private group has organized “Pups for Peace,” a program that hopes to send 1,000 trained bomb-sniffing dogs to Israel. Dogs in that program are purchased, donated or rescued from shelters.

While breeders and trainers see a great future for dogs in bomb detection, researchers are working to replace them with a high-tech gadget. Bomb-detection devices at present are expensive and cumbersome, but it probably is only a matter of time before some wizard comes up with a cheap, hand-held device.
Article Obtained From; http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1571/is_3_19/ai_96893649

Cow Dog Trials-2008 Trial/Event Calendar

Please Note:

Quite a few of the links are no longer working…..sorry about that!!! But I am keeping this posted in the hopes that some of the info listed will be helpful 🙂

2008 Trial/Event Calendar

Cattle/Cow Dog Trials & Clinics – At a Glance

~ 2008 ~
May 10 – Hubbard SDT – Hubbard, TX
(254) 582-9724; jwalker@hillsboro.net
May 10-11 – Central Washington Cow Dog Trial – Moses Lake, WA 2008 Entry Form
(509) 793-5553; jegbuddy@hotmail.com; (509) 349-8833; gedwards@scml.us


MAY 14-17 – USBCHA NATIONAL CATTLEDOG FINALS – TORRINGTON, WY

May 17-18 – Sundowner Stockdog Association Trial – Crossfire Arena – Calera, OK

May 16, 17 & 18 – Cow Girl Up Cow Dog Clinic
Clinicians – Sandi Newton (working cow dogs) & Carolyn Carey (low stress cattle handling/management). Visit www.cowdogcollege.com for details.

May 31 – June 1 – Lc Farms Cattle TrialSedalia, MO
(660) 827-6820; jlmoore@iland.net

June 6 – 7 – Top of Texas Cattle TrialsPampa, TX
(806) 665-3534

June 7 – MS Stockdog Sheep & Cattle – Senatobia, MS
(662) 324-5075; scruggsbc@yahoo.com


June 14 – Iowa Shoot Out (Day 1) – Moravia, Iowa
Open, Pro-Novice, Novice, Nursery – Ed Ball (641) 933-5844; eball@psbalbia.com


June 15 – Iowa Shoot Out (Day 2) – Keosauqua, Iowa
Open, Pro-Novice, Novice, Nursery – Gary Goehring (641) 919-0865 or (319) 293-2556

June 14-15 – Snaffle Bit Ranch Reunion de Perro de Rancho – Lodi, CA
(530) 320-1699; jwilliams@cowdognews.com


June 21 – DMS Annual Cow Dog Trial – Vanderhoof, BC, Canada


June 21-22 – Sundowner Stockdog Association Trial – Crossfire Arena – Calera, OK

June 27-29 – Kevin Howell Clinic – Rafter Lazy J Ranch – Parkfield, CA


July 12-13 – Thousand Springs Ranch Dog Trial – Fall River Mills, CA
(530) 336-6639; jimgilligan@hughes.net


July 13Cattle Arena Trial – Irricana, Alberta, Canada
(403) 935-4543; aspatria@hotmail.com


July 19-20 – Tri-Co Cattle Classic – Fort Klamath, OR
(Fort Klamath lodging is very limited – it’s never too early to make reservations!)
(530) 320-1699; jwilliams@cowdognews.com

August 22-24 – Fort Klamath Cattle Dog Trial & Rodear – Fort Klamath, OR
(Fort Klamath lodging is very limited – it’s never too early to make reservations!)
(530) 320-1699; jwilliams@cowdognews.com

September 6-7 – Top of Texas Cattle TrialsPampa, TX
(806) 665-3534

September 13-14 – Sundowner Stockdog Association Trial – Crossfire Arena – Calera, OK

Octobert 4- 5Red Creek Farm CDTTownville, SC
(864) 287-5104; cat@redcreekfarm.com

October 4-5 – CQ’s Classic Cow Dog Trial – Galt, CA
Judi Schmidt (209) 333-0780; cutrquarters@softcom.net; Judy Rodman (209) 745-2281

October 11-12 – Langtry Cattle Dog Showcase (to be held in a new pasture this year!)
Middletown, CA – (530) 320-1699; jwilliams@cowdognews.com


October 11-12 – Sundowner Stockdog Association Trial – Crossfire Arena – Calera, OK

October 11-12 – Southeastern Iowa Cattle Dog Trial Trial – (2.5 miles north of) Keosauqua, Iowa
Day: (641) 919-0865 or nights: (319) 293-2556.

October 14 – MS Stockdog Sheep/Cattle Trials – Jackson, MS
(662) 324-5075; scruggsbc@yahoo.com


October 18 – Wild Bunch Cattle Trials – Crawford, TX
(254) 486-2500; f.raley@att.net

November 1-2 – Snaffle Bit Ranch Reunion de Perro de Rancho – Lodi, CA
(530) 320-1699; jwilliams@cowdognews.com


November 8-9 – Sundowner Stockdog Association Fall Futurity – Crossfire Arena – Calera, OK

November 15-16 – Brandon Farm Cattle Dog Trial – Greeneville, TN

December 13-14 – Snaffle Bit Ranch Reunion de Perro de Rancho – Lodi, CA
(530) 320-1699; jwilliams@cowdognews.com